Is it destiny?

I restarted work on the Old Shale Shawl, but after about 20 rows of 200+ stitches, there was something not quite right: while the total number of stitches was correct, their distribution was slightly out of the main axis. After checking and counting again, I spread the shawl open and, horror, I noticed where the issue came from:

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The main axis was shifted by a couple of stitches.

Is it destiny that I unravel it back to that point? That’s more or less the same point where the shading didn’t fully match.

Of course, I would rather not do that, considered the 200+ sts in each row – about 20 of them. Also, it seems difficult to place a lifeline following one row, because the horizontal pattern is not laying straight.

Alternatively, I could perhaps attempt something that I’ve read about, but have not much confidence in trying out here: unravelling just a vertical line of ~4 stitches. It’d probably be an easy task for an experienced knitter, but this is not the case for me :)

What would you do?

Silk sea

The silk forest theme is awaiting for a decision and more silk yarn (ordered)… meanwhile, I wanted to try out how the knitting with this silk would have been.

Using a skein in Seaweed shade and summery colours, the test Sea Top was born!

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It is based on the free pattern Simple Irresistible by Espino Susunaga. My idea is to have an easy-to-wear, cool and lose top to juggle over a summer outfit – while at the same time testing the silk yarn behaviour.

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To get a loser fit, I went up two needle sizes and casted on some more stitches. The top has no waist shaping and I’m going to use a smaller needle to achieve a slight tapered effect in the centre. After knitting the bottom section, ideally I should put that on waste yarn and try it on… I doubt I’ll bother though. Obviously, there is the risk of it being too lose…

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The silk so far has proved to be relatively easy to knit, a bit “papery” looking in some spots, but with a nice subtle sheen and easy drape. The lose fit gives the top some nice bouncing.

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Silk forest?

While I’m pondering on how to proceed with the Old Shale Shawl, I was tidying up some of my stash. We shall not go into details of the stash, though.

I rediscovered some silk yarn I purchased while ago because of its colours – greens, with shades of blues or browns. Not a surprise, lol.

Looking up on Ravelry, there were quite a large number of patterns for the “forest” keyword. I didn’t get through even a fraction of them and already found many a beautiful one – some even free.

Though, I have never knitted with silk yarn before and don’t know what to expect. I understand that it has little to no elasticity, which is confirmed by the feeling while balling up one of the skeins.

These are the colours I intend to use:

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and these are some of the patterns I perused thus far:

Hidden in The Forest by Veera Välimäki

Pine Forest Baby Blanket by Ingrid Aartun Bøe

Olympic Forest Baby Blanket by verybusymonkey

Gothic Forest Scarf by Janelle Martin

Queen of the Forest by Amadeit

Deep Green Forest by Espino Susunaga

I would love to hear about your experience with silk, how did you find knitting with it?

Houston, We’ve Got a Problem

In the previous post, you have seen the last error-free picture of the shawl. Sadly, immediately after I took that picture, I ran into a problem…

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The natural shading no longer matches with the previous repeats. Sigh.

My rational side suggests to place a lifeline, unravel back to the end of the last fan motif and reknit with matching colours. The practical side of me, who would like to avoid the hassle and finish this before next week, is not agreeing so much.

For the moment I just left the shawl aside, with the risk of getting stuck. I’ll give some more time to think and then need to make some decision!

it’s getting huge

The Old Shale Shawl is progressing well and just hit the 100th row.

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It is getting fairly large, I just hope that the 80cm circular will hold it until the end – I wouldn’t really fancy having to shift the 200+ stitches across.

I’m in love with the shades of the yarn and can’t wait to have it bound off, so I can stretch and see it in full!

Have a nice Sunday <3

British Shetland fibre

A quick post in between exams, just to show some awesome sweetness I recently purchased from Hilltop Cloud:

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British Shetland Top Roving Hand Dyed by Hilltop Cloud

It’s Superfine British Shetland Top Roving hand-dyed. Hilltop Cloud offers some amazing fibre and also various accessories and kits (no, I’m not getting paid to advertise it!).

It’s a lovely squishy hearty blue-green dream, in two different colourways: 2044, which is a blue/green/gray/light blue mix, and 2048, in similar shades except with gray shades replaces by purplish tones. Hard to describe, I better let the pictures speak for themselves (all pictures are taken from Hilltop Cloud’s product pages).

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Aren’t they beautiful?

…the only issue with them, is that I still haven’t learn to spin! I was hoping to attend a small workshop but my budget at the moment is under strain… student life. Not that this is so bad: with a bit of time and complimentary assistance of the world-wide-web I will try some LIY (learn-it-yourself).

Oh, and I still have a few batches of divine fleece to wash – and source some inexpensive combers (any advice or hints on combers are welcome).

Have a nice woolly week!