Healthy Brownies recipe (flour and yeast free)

In a recent post I showed some “alternative” brownies I made as a slightly healthier variant to enjoy in these stay-indoor, low-exercise days.

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Here’s the recipe, in case you might want to try.

These are not as sweet as the store-bought ones, so you might want to adjust sweetness to suit your taste. Keep sugar quantity to a minimum for a healthier version.

It could be adapted for vegans by replacing eggs and chocolate with vegan alternatives 🙂

Makes 4 small browny loaves (like the ones in the picture)

INGREDIENTS:

> Quantities are slightly approximate as I improvised <

250g Aduki beans (Japanese red beans*)
3 eggs
50g coconut butter
100g cocoa powder
50g dark chocolate
50g sugar
1 pinch of sea salt (enhances the sweetness)

STEPS:

Prepare 4 small baking trays (each about 12 by 22 cm, 4.5 by 8.5 inches, or so) – they don’t need to be very deep, but at least 5 cm, 2 inches.

Line them with baking paper to prevent sticking. 

Cook the aduki beans in water for a long time (approximately 2 hours) until they’re well cooked and soft.

Drain them of water and let them cool down.

Preheat your oven at about 180 degree Celsius, with top and bottom heating. 

Mash them with the blender until they have a soft paste consistency and the skins are no more detectable.

The consistency should be soft but not too watery (slightly runny but not much).

Add the coconut butter and whisk, then the cocoa powder, sugar and salt, while continuing to whisk. Finally add the eggs.

When done, mix in small chunks of the dark chocolate (about half of the choc bar).

The mix is now ready to go in the lined baking trays. Distribute evenly across the trays.

Shake gently to allow the mix to settle. Spread some choc chips on top. The mix should be about 1/2 inch (1 to 1 1/2 cm) deep.

Bake in the oven until the mix is dry but not very dry (it shouldn’t be as dry as biscuits or cake, but rather still retain a somewhat spongey texture).

The baking time might vary slightly from oven to oven, for me it took approximately one hour. I checked them from time to time to assess the cooking stage. 

When cooked, let them slowly cool down.

Then cut into slices or tiles and serve. 

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These can keep for some days – I stored them in the fridge, but a cool and dry area might work as well. 

If you make them, let me know how this worked for you.. hope you enjoy them!

* Aduki beans (aka as adzuki or azuki) are Japanese red beans, see https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/glossary/aduki-bean. I got these ones through Amazon (no paid link)

 

 

Repairing an antique chest of drawers

I really love this antique, probably Victorian, chest of drawers, despite its sad state.

Victorian chest of drawers

Victorian chest of drawers in need of restoration

My hope is to one day being able to use it in my home – but before that, it will need at least a degree of TLC to make it functional, if not perfect. I might be in for a looong term plan…

Some time ago I made a start, by repairing one of the broken drawers: the back was partly broken and coming off, part of the sides were split and bits had come off.

The sides are being repaired – the clamps hold the parts in place while the glue sets. Note the back is still broken and the dove-tail joins are coming undone

To restore it, I used wood glue to reattach the parts that had broken off, while for the joins I opted for liquid hide glue because it’s reversible (this is what could be used for “proper’ restoration, as it can be later taken apart if needed).

This is the drawer after the repair

I’m quite pleased with the results!

Ideally, this work should be done in a garage or a workshop – that is, if you had one….

Starting the Boxie shawl

While I wait for inspiration to knit the border onto the Nurmiluntu shawl I started the Boxie Shawl (pattern by the Agrarian Artisan).

Boxie is a traditional triangular shawl worked from the top down. It’s a crochet shawl that uses two 100g skeins of 4-ply yarn.

I opted to use some DK from my stash instead (Diggle and Colour Splan by Woolyknit), but I’m now questioning whether the results might be as nice – with a thicker yarn the holes in the resulting fabric will be larger, and holes in crochet is one reason why I’m not too keen on this technique for producing certain items. What do you think? Does the yarn suit the pattern?

While writing here the yarn details, I just realised that both yarns are classified as DK, but one is definitely thinner than the other. Colour Splash, the variegated one, is 97 meters / 50 grams, while Diggle, the green one, is 123 meters / 50 grams….. ooops!

When I chose the yarn, these colours seemed to be working together pretty well. Does the colour combination really work once worked up?

I’m not sure what to do…. a little voice whispers “frog”…

Nurmilintu shawl

My Nurmilintu had a set back while ago, when I was nearing the end of the main section, the needle slipped and many stitches came undone. The shawl is knit in a beautiful but slippery and unforgiving yarn (The Natural Dye Studio’s Dazzle Sock in Dragonfly, 100% Bluefaced Leicester wool)… it was not possible to rescue. Frogged back by a significant chunk of the body and time-contumely picked the stitches up… sigh. Then re-knit.

Now the body is done and the shawl went to the side – got a bit stuck because I wasn’t familiar with the stitch for the border… Also, I didn’t like the pointy border that much. The border was rethought and I decided to go for a knit-on border. I found some tutorials and nice candidates, but stopped there…

I hope to gather the swing again and finish it in the near future!

Do you have projects that got you stuck?

 

 

Reusable bag for produce

I made a reusable bag for produce!

produce-bag-1produce-bag-2produce-bag-3

I follow Celia’s blog (Fig Jam and Lime Cordial) and she often offers interesting ideas to save the environment.

One of these is to make reusable bags for produce to avoid using plastic bags (VERY BAD for the environment) or paper bags (much better, but still why use unnecessary resources and cut down trees).

She used net fabric but I didm’t have any at hand. I didn’t want to use man-made fibre (= nylon = plastic = oil = BAD for nature)

The idea stayed in the back of my mind for a while, then one day it came to my mind that I had some vintage cotton (a charity shop from while ago) in my collection.

vintage-cotton-yarn

While cotton is a natural fibre, it is not necessarily good for our Earth: it uses a lot of water to produce the raw material and then process it. A LOT, like in

20,000 LITERS
The amount of water needed to produce one kilogram of cotton; equivalent to a single t-shirt and pair of jeans.

(source: WWF https://www.worldwildlife.org/industries/cotton). So I was happy to use some unwanted vintage one.

Pattern:
I went freestyle –  just did some filet crochet alternating sections of standard filet with parts of double-chain ((I think – whatever it is that it results in a “full square” rather than the “empty square” of filet).

Project notes with instructions:

https://www.ravelry.com/projects/ItWasJudith/reusable-produce-bag

produce-bag-4

produce-bag-5

produce-bag-6 The first side

The only thing to improve is possibly making it with a finer yarn to obtain a lighter weight; this one is about 20-25g for a small size (finished bag is approximately 19×24 cm).

The bag is now finished and is being carried in my rucksack for when I go food shopping.

It’s perfect for the small vegetables (mushrooms, beans, carrots..), nuts or fruits (kiwi, mandarines), etc.

It can store the items as long as needed and then reused. When dirty it can be easily washed.

I’m so happy to have made it!