The Fiver Curtain

(Vintage Way No. 2)

Finally this weekend I was able to dedicate some time to repurpose a lucky find from some time ago: a curtain in a beautiful shade of blue.

The material: curtain and matching haberdashery (all for a fiver). It feels like a linen-cotton fabric, so not bad at all.

The bathroom needed a small one to avoid or reduce see-through when the lights are on at night.

Luckily the width of the repurposed material perfectly fitted in our window, so the work needed wasn’t a lot.. but bear in mind that currently I have no sewing machine, so it’s hand stitching all the way.

Before being shortened

Out it came (part of) my sewing thread stash (lots of vintage threads and some less old – ebay, charity and market finds). For a quick refresh on some more of my stash, see this old post: Wooden Reels (no, this isn’t it all, and yes, they’re still stored in boxes). If I ever need a colour, I’m pretty confident it’s going to be in there, or at least something closely matching..

In my usual freestyle way, I didn’t do much of complicate measurements (i.e. none). After putting it up on the curtain rail I just marked the desired length in a couple of points, then proceeded to bast and cut the extra length.

The extra length has just been cut off

The bottom has been basted, ready for trying it up

Then the edge was fixed – the result is not particularly pretty, but works. There was a little fiddling with the basting as in the middle section the length was slightly longer. Then the two layers were fixed together with a small, mostly hidden stitch. And that was it: new curtain’s up!

“New” vintage curtain is up!

It still needs a curtain hook to hold it on a side when open, then the haberdashery blue rope can be put to use too.

I was very happy to repurpose the lucky find: “new” nice curtain for a fiver.

Environmentally friendly: check; economic: check. Win-win.

~ ~ ~

As some may have noticed I don’t blog very often. I thought about it, and I believe it’s due to my instinct of presenting things only when they’re complete. This way I miss out on the spontaneous update and just putting it out to the world really.  So I end up having quite a few photos of things I’ve done, seen or am making, but actually posting very little of them. Also, life often gets in the way and throws many things at you – sometimes there isn’t just enough energy left to sit, edit photos and write it all down. I wonder if that’s a common problem with bloggers?

Anyway, next time (this week!), I will discuss:

“New” Curtains. The vintage way.

In the bedroom there were some really unappealing wooden blinds, which were inherited from the previous owner.

I really dislike blinds (understatement).

Recently I was lucky to find a set of vintage Jonelle curtains, in cotton fabric and made in England. They look like new, clean and crisp. The price tag was very friendly, which was a nice extra. *Happy*

The only things needed were a pole and some hooks to hang it.

And finally yesterday we scored a very nice wooden pole (it has acorn shaped finials!). Acorns and oaks are one of my favourite plants, so the acorn motif was just perfect. *Happy*

Today we took the old ones down and put the ‘new’ curtains up… I just love them!

What makes me even happier is that the whole thing is very environmentally friendly – only the pole is a new product. I even had vintage brass hooks to use, so didn’t need to buy the crappy plastic ones. *Very Happy*

Another day in vintage life style.

Do you like and buy vintage?

The curtains are made of Jonelle pure cotton, in green/cream with a leafy motif.

The curtains are made of Jonelle pure cotton, in green/cream with a leafy motif.

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The curtains finally hung, only need shortening

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The pretty wooden pole with acorn finial

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Vintage brass curtain hooks

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The old wooden blinds.. now gone on Freecycle

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VforVintageLondon and the Flat Cat (the Perfect Pet)

I’ve been an avid buyer (hoarder) of vintage, inspired by the beauty of certain objects and the story they may tell us. This you may already perhaps know if you’ve been reading my blog for some time.

London, where I’m based, has a very bad value for money when it come to accommodations. But what has this got to do with the former statement? Well, being space at a premium, it was necessary to resize my vintage beloved collections.

So VforVintageLondon was born.

You can now find us on Etsy!

Meanwhile, the first order has been placed for this cute and rare cut out of the Perfect Pet. Let me introduce you to the FLAT CAT, a low-maintenance sweet companion:

FLAT CAT the Perfect Cat, a rare cut-out by Blue Q

FLAT CAT the Perfect Cat (Blue Q, 1988)

I’ve been super busy uploading some of my vintage troves to the shop.

Many others will soon be available: vintage costume jewellery, patterns, old tins, accessories, dresses, homewares, folk linens… and more will be regularly added, so perhaps follow me? (cheeky, I know!)

If you find anything you fancy, you can use one of these discount codes:

VFORVINTAGEWELCOME (£5 off on items from £10)

VFORVINTAGELONDONWSB (£2 off on items from £5)

Both voucher codes expire on the 11th December 2016.

Your questions, comments and feedback are welcome!

Vintage postcard, circa WWI

Vintage postcard, circa WWI, probably French

 

What does a mouse do with a £20 note?

Well, there are many mice in this universe and I cannot tell you what each one would do, but I can report on what the mouse I know has done.

Firstly, it went on a stroll through the local high street, where – by coincidence – there is a high concentration of charity shops.

While there, it thought that in winter there is a bad draft coming from the windows, and maybe this could be fixed somehow. Likewise, it is impractical to have needles here and there, and a little needle holder may be useful. Said mouse also has a liking for blue and red combined together – a bit like you would have in some folky/nordic patterns.

Thus, the mouse proceeded to purchase various material for making and upcycling projects. I was a bit puzzled by what the mouse could do with the things it got. I could not guess, so the mouse had to explain me. I wonder if you can guess? The mouse kindly allowed me to provide some photographical clues.

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And this one is not a clue, but simple evidence:

a little blue, white and red dress

a little blue, white and red dress

the little dress, front view

…and there is also some pale blue lining.

what a cool brand name

The brand is Happie Loves It. You cannot not love this.

As a little side note, I will inform you that it is customary in our household to blame a phantom mouse for any misfit – mostly involving culinary excesses, like having an ice cream in the night.

On a lazy Sunday stroll in town I found..

[of colours, nature and harmony]

a few more pieces that aroused my interest. More details in another post, here just a peek..

flower field by the deep riverflower field by the deep river

 

green is for Hope
green is for Hope

 

at the foot of the mountain
at the foot of the mountain

 

Observing the folds in the photo above, my mind associated the image with the 16th-century ‘Bathing Feet in a Mountain Landscape‘ silk painting by Hsieh Shih-ch’en (please have a look at the page, I’ll wait for you): if you follow the link, zoom-in the image to see the details and the serene person resting in the nature. From the Arts Connected’s webpage here is a peaceful inscription from the painting:

In deep seclusion the eastern wind blows fallen blossoms,

The whole river of spring water ripples with cloudy mist;

The wanderer’s song has ceased and he is entirely at leisure,

Resting by an old valley pine while the sun has not yet set.

(Hsieh Shih-ch’en)

[Disclosure: I’m not an art expert.. just came across this while searching for some definition!] I hope these last words brought some calmness and harmony into your first day of the week. Take good care x

Wooden reels

A few days ago, I wrote a short post on my “new” old wooden reels. I just took some pictures which you will find here below.

I’m looking for ideas to store the thread in a lean and accessible way… at the moment they’re sadly homed in a box, so if you have ideas or want to tell how you dealt with this, please leave a comment 🙂

Please also tell about if you know any of the stories behind these threads – they mostly seem to be made in Great Britain, so they must be fairly old!

Have a lovely weekend xx

my reels chess boardImage

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close-ups of the makers information [maybe I should research them at some point]

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About fabrics, haberdashery and patterned skirts (Old Spitalfields part 3)

Let me introduce the items of the final part of this mini-journey through my most recent troves: it’s all about haberdashery this time.

We start with a rich piece in a deepest brown background and orange details. It bears similarities to some folk patterns like these ones: Vintage Apron with Folk Design, Russian folk art bowl and spoon. I could imagine it as a decoration to pieces as those featured in this Kate Davies’ post on traditional knitting patterns (especially the Estonian ones) and in another on ’70s embroidery. Enough with the talking, here are some pictures..

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Then, there are two lighter trims, featuring respectively a forget-me-not and a heart pattern on simple cream backgrounds, as well as a nice fish-scale border.

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That’s it for this short series…!