Handmade jewellery pouches! And yarn. And a Victorian ceiling rose.

I’ve been making wee bags to coordinate with the costume jewellery in my collection.

The collection started out because I saw things “I just liked” (uh oh, sounds familiar). I love it all, but I seldom use jewellery these days.. The vintage pieces are in time going to be posted on Etsy (whenever I get around to take beautiful photos and prepare the listings). I also plan to attend some small markets or events, like the ABBS that take place this Sunday in London (near Kentish Town, details here).

All of the bags are hand sewn. I used different materials:

  • Harris Tweed wool
  • velveteen (the purple and the orange)
  • corduroy (the black with red roses)

The Harris Tweed was a one-of lucky purchase – they were remnants, probably small offcuts from clothing and accessory production. The tweed came in various colours: beige, greys, dark green/dark red, brown/green/orange and so on. It’s very beautiful but until now I didn’t have an idea of what to make with it. I’m very happy that I finally thought of using the fabrics for these small pouches, because they’re beautiful materials and I love the results! I plan to make many more, as spare time allows..

Here’s an overview of those made so far (they still need ironing). What do you think?

My handmade jewellery bags

Corduroy in black and red, with a lovely rose motif

Purple velveteen

Orange velveteen

Harris Tweed wool in assorted colours

Harris Tweed bags and vintage jewellery

This one was made by an old friend of mine with a sewing machine. It’s much larger and can be used to wrap presents.

 

The bags laid out for photo shooting and planning the next ones to be made

~ ~ ~

I also want to show you my last stash enhancement! Tangled Yarn is having a sale and soon it’s my birthday, so I treated myself to some gorgeous yarn by Shilasdair (a Scottish company based on the Isle of Skye). I already had some DK in Winter Loch and Summer Loch shades, to which I now added more of the Winter Loch (a dusty shade of blue), as well as some 4 Ply in Rowan Berry. These are the beauties (sorry for the bad evening light):

Shilasdair stash enhancement

Shilasdair DK in Winter Loch

Shilasdair 4 Ply in Rowan Berry

~ ~ ~

Finally I also would like to share one of the DIY activities happening in the flat. The ceiling rose is being restored to its original Victorian beauty. It’s a WIP and may take quite a while to complete.

Firstly a vintage fancy (and heavy!) chandelier has been bought from Belgium. Now the stucco of the rose is being restored: in time it had been covered by layer upon layer of paint and its beautiful details were mostly lost.

There is an absolutely ecological and healthy way to remove the crap engulfing the stucco: PORRIDGE! Hard to believe but it works!

Here is evidence of the proceeding – unfortunately we forgot to take a picture of it before starting works, but you can still see how it was in the outer circle of the rose (which has yet to be handled).

The ceiling rose stucco (central section) covered in porridge and cling film (it does look weird)

The porridge has been removed and the layers have come off with it

Gentle mechanical work with a small plastic spatula is required to remove the extra material from the corner areas

After most of the extra material had been removed. Notice the difference between the inner and outer sections.

I plan to be back soon with a small update about the preparations for the ABBS and my Etsy shop.

Good night!

VforVintageLondon and the Flat Cat (the Perfect Pet)

I’ve been an avid buyer (hoarder) of vintage, inspired by the beauty of certain objects and the story they may tell us. This you may already perhaps know if you’ve been reading my blog for some time.

London, where I’m based, has a very bad value for money when it come to accommodations. But what has this got to do with the former statement? Well, being space at a premium, it was necessary to resize my vintage beloved collections.

So VforVintageLondon was born.

You can now find us on Etsy!

Meanwhile, the first order has been placed for this cute and rare cut out of the Perfect Pet. Let me introduce you to the FLAT CAT, a low-maintenance sweet companion:

FLAT CAT the Perfect Cat, a rare cut-out by Blue Q

FLAT CAT the Perfect Cat (Blue Q, 1988)

I’ve been super busy uploading some of my vintage troves to the shop.

Many others will soon be available: vintage costume jewellery, patterns, old tins, accessories, dresses, homewares, folk linens… and more will be regularly added, so perhaps follow me? (cheeky, I know!)

If you find anything you fancy, you can use one of these discount codes:

VFORVINTAGEWELCOME (£5 off on items from £10)

VFORVINTAGELONDONWSB (£2 off on items from £5)

Both voucher codes expire on the 11th December 2016.

Your questions, comments and feedback are welcome!

Vintage postcard, circa WWI

Vintage postcard, circa WWI, probably French

 

WIPs and other things

Quick recap – some little progress on a couple of projects and a few more WIPs that need to come out of their hibernation state.

The Holiday Vest got s bunch of rows added and a snap pic of the current state of the back part:

IMG_5780 IMG_5781 

Not long ago I started a stash-busting mindless project: the 44^2 Blanket. It’s just made out of squares in a Native Americans colour theme (which I’m probably the only one to see!) – it’s reached its 25% mark thus far:

IMG_5775

Two further projects that need to be brought back to life are the Kingfisher Old Shale Shawl and the Thistle Lace Scarf. And perhaps the Feline Draught Stopper… with the new season approaching we’re all very busy, so this step may not happen yet!

I also bought some more yarn – it was truly a one-off opportunity… auctions ending on a sunday with hardly any bidders! So, on that front I’m well into the BLE mark. I also had fun swatching some green Shetland wool. Photos below…

angora+wool 1ply lambswool 1.5ply lambswool 1.5ply lambswool 1.5ply lambswool+cashmere fine 1ply wool 1.5ply wool 3plyIMG_5771

Finally, I ‘ve poking around tech stuff – which is a separate matter, so I won’t bother you with the details 🙂

Enjoy the weekend!

(a long one for those based in England)

On holiday without yarn

With cabin luggage only, there was no space to bring yarny stuff. 

But then I wanted to knit, so the easy solution was to get some yarn locally: I chose Avantgarde from Adriafil, because it’s locally made pure wool and can be machine-washed. I liked the pale blue shade with bits of colour.

I made up a simple pattern for a vest – nothing very special, just a simple project. 

After coming back from the holiday, things became quite hectic: I graduated and started interviewing.

Today I finally resumed work on the back part of the vest and, despite the 4ply yarn, the progress is visible – better, it would have been visible if I had taken recent pictures!

The project is ravelled as Holiday Vest. Some old pictures – apologies for the rather poor quality:

Holiday Vest - front

Holiday Vest, the front

Holiday Vest - waist

Holiday Vest, waist part

I fully appreciate that photos from the holiday sightseeings would have constituted a far more interesting post content!

 

Is it destiny?

I restarted work on the Old Shale Shawl, but after about 20 rows of 200+ stitches, there was something not quite right: while the total number of stitches was correct, their distribution was slightly out of the main axis. After checking and counting again, I spread the shawl open and, horror, I noticed where the issue came from:

Image

The main axis was shifted by a couple of stitches.

Is it destiny that I unravel it back to that point? That’s more or less the same point where the shading didn’t fully match.

Of course, I would rather not do that, considered the 200+ sts in each row – about 20 of them. Also, it seems difficult to place a lifeline following one row, because the horizontal pattern is not laying straight.

Alternatively, I could perhaps attempt something that I’ve read about, but have not much confidence in trying out here: unravelling just a vertical line of ~4 stitches. It’d probably be an easy task for an experienced knitter, but this is not the case for me 🙂

What would you do?

Houston, We’ve Got a Problem

In the previous post, you have seen the last error-free picture of the shawl. Sadly, immediately after I took that picture, I ran into a problem…

ImageImage

 

The natural shading no longer matches with the previous repeats. Sigh.

My rational side suggests to place a lifeline, unravel back to the end of the last fan motif and reknit with matching colours. The practical side of me, who would like to avoid the hassle and finish this before next week, is not agreeing so much.

For the moment I just left the shawl aside, with the risk of getting stuck. I’ll give some more time to think and then need to make some decision!

it’s getting huge

The Old Shale Shawl is progressing well and just hit the 100th row.

Image

It is getting fairly large, I just hope that the 80cm circular will hold it until the end – I wouldn’t really fancy having to shift the 200+ stitches across.

I’m in love with the shades of the yarn and can’t wait to have it bound off, so I can stretch and see it in full!

Have a nice Sunday ❤