Online shopping in times of sheltering

The Object of Art. The Theory of Illusion in Eighteenth-Century France. Marian Hobson, 1982

Spending longer time at home is a mild enabler for online purchases…

I ordered some organic seeds to attempt window-sill “gardening”. Mixed salad, Italian basil and rocket salad will be planted in whatever minimal space a London flat with no balcony allows. The greens will have to compete with the few resident flowers.

I also looked at books.

As a child and teen I “devoured” books. Nowadays I hardly manage to finish reading one, which is a sad thing indeed. I suspect the rise of technology at one’s fingertips has affected my concentration levels. There are studies on how tech, allowing a constant state of alert and stimuli, might affect the capacity of the brain to concentrate and perform. Gone are the days of sweet lazy relaxing time.

So it’s not really sensible buying books… In principle, I’m a curious person with various interests, so maybe that’s the reason why I do it?

As a minor justification, I recently sold, unwillingly, a beautiful set of antique books (Old and New London, 1881). A number of books, CDs and DVDs were also rehoused through MusicMagpie (normally I would donate them, but now charity points are shut, so they were sold).

What are these new (second-hand) books?

The Object of Art. The Theory of Illusion in Eighteenth-Century France. Marian Hobson, 1982

A Wicked Company: The Forgotten Radicalism of the European Enlightenment. Philipp Blom

Enlightening the world : Encyclopédie, the book that changed the course of history. Philipp Blom

I’ve become enamoured of 18th century artefacts and am collecting what I can from that era – books, minor silver and clothing. It was a period of seminal changes in Western history and I’m keen to better understand that time and way of life.

Is there an era that fascinates you?