Wooden reels

A few days ago, I wrote a short post on my “new” old wooden reels. I just took some pictures which you will find here below.

I’m looking for ideas to store the thread in a lean and accessible way… at the moment they’re sadly homed in a box, so if you have ideas or want to tell how you dealt with this, please leave a comment 🙂

Please also tell about if you know any of the stories behind these threads – they mostly seem to be made in Great Britain, so they must be fairly old!

Have a lovely weekend xx

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close-ups of the makers information [maybe I should research them at some point]

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About fabrics, haberdashery and patterned skirts (Old Spitalfields part 3)

Let me introduce the items of the final part of this mini-journey through my most recent troves: it’s all about haberdashery this time.

We start with a rich piece in a deepest brown background and orange details. It bears similarities to some folk patterns like these ones: Vintage Apron with Folk Design, Russian folk art bowl and spoon. I could imagine it as a decoration to pieces as those featured in this Kate Davies’ post on traditional knitting patterns (especially the Estonian ones) and in another on ’70s embroidery. Enough with the talking, here are some pictures..

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Then, there are two lighter trims, featuring respectively a forget-me-not and a heart pattern on simple cream backgrounds, as well as a nice fish-scale border.

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That’s it for this short series…!

About fabrics, haberdashery and patterned skirts (Old Spitalfields part 2)

As promised, here is a post about my other recent “troves”. Some of the photos are fuzzy because of the late afternoon poor light, sorry for that.

First things first, I’ll start with some actual items, that is some skirts that I fell in love with because of their patterns (and colour schemes). They may be restyled at some point, though I still haven’t worked out the details – pondering stage in progress.

The first skirt features a check pattern in dark blue, rich red and tan beige. I love the colour combination, but the style may need some adjustments, as its length is not really suitable to an average height person like myself (tongue-sticking-out face). It would be lovely to wear with a grey blue outfit, matt tights and powder blue ballerinas (blue? what a surprise…). The fabric is rather thick, cotton corduroy like. Here are some pictures – disclosure: colour rendering didn’t work out at its best, please activate imagination mode:

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Next, another skirt in a completely different style: flowery and light pattern, silky-like fabric and knee length, definitely something more for springtime (weather permitting). Its motif captured my eyes (poppies are very popular where I come from, see this post from the National Geographic) and the colours are simply adorable. A light-hearted and happy style that calls for warmer days. [are those poppies or wild roses?]

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We now move on to the fabrics section. Both are small-ish pieces, but it wasn’t enough a good reason to leave them (wee grin). The first fabric is a dramatic rich red roses on a black background, in cotton corduroy. The most accurate rendering of the colours is in the first photo; the orange-y tones in the subsequent ones are not correct.

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The second fabric is a thick wool small piece, with heathery pastel stripes and a subtle herringbone texture. May be just enough for a simple A-line skirt (hope), which would go well with a high-collar minimal sweater like the one that I recently purchased in a heather pink pure wool.

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The post is becoming too lengthy, I will put the remaining items in part no. 3 of this series… bear with me.

Quirky jewellery at the Old Spitalfields Market

Today the sun made a benevolent appearance and given its scarce presence in spring this year, I took this opportunity to brave the cold and visit the Old Spitalfields Market. According to Wikipedia, this has been the site of a market since the early XVII century and was then located in a rural area in the outskirts of London. [Edit: recently they discovered a Roman cemetery on the site]. Nowadays it’s in the heart of the city and hosts fashion, speciality food and vintage markets, with different themes for the various days of the week. I didn’t take any pictures of the market to avoid delays, but I promise I will in my next visit!

I’ve been living in this city for quite some time (years) now, but this is the first time me visiting a fashion market, if we exclude the neighbouring one in Camden Town (shame on me). This is really strange indeed, given that I love all vintage happenings, flea markets and anything where one can find the unique item, accessory or something that can be later included in a new creation. Let’s blame the fact that in these years I’ve been really busy with my studies and work.. smile.

So, on this sunny-but-cold Saturday, my partner volunteered to accompany me to the market – knowing that I would end up in endless searches and scrutiny of what on offer, it was a brave decision. Thus, I am grateful for that, as I did bring home some special items.

In this post I will focus on a few bits of quirky jewellery, now re-homed to my address for a bargain price.. obviously, I love bargains!

There are three pieces that I chose among the many at a little stall in this beautiful covered square. More later on the other items that I got there, and elsewhere, in these days – here I’ll keep on the jewellery theme and leave the fabrics for the following one.

First I picked a heart pendant, with the aim of finding later a suitable black or deep red satin cord necklace (or maybe this one or this?) to complement it. Its delicate filigree metalwork reminded me of Etruscan jewellery and a silver butterfly brooch that my mother used to have. The mysterious Etruscans had an important culture and governed a large part of Italy before the Romans; they left some extraordinary examples of art, from goldsmith artefacts to pottery and bronzes… anyway, I’m now digressing.

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The next item was a decadent bracelet composed by three rings of coloured pearls, in black, dark red and rich English Rose tones, with matching chiffon top styled as flowers. It’s probably something that I wouldn’t wear everyday, especially given my low-key appearance and no-jewellery daily outfits, but I could imagine that it would work well for an evening out with a black sleeveless dress, or with a goth outfit that I occasionally wear in the alternative Camden.

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It took me a while to choose the last one among other candidates, but in the end I took with me a wooden, glass beads and coloured shell necklace. I loved its pair of wood rings, the delicate shades of the real shell and the small glass beads. At first sight I thought it to be a bit on the excessive side, but when I analysed the quality of the material, it appeared to be just a genuinely quirk piece. And if I won’t get to wear it, I can always re-use (upcycle?) its bits: for example, out of the wooden rings make brooches for some own-made shawlette, scarf or cowl – I’d just need a steel or horn pin; or use the beads in the lace-y detail of an accessory. Ideas are plenty, so no worries there.

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Off to prepare some fish dish now.. Stay tuned, more to come about fabrics, haberdashery and some original skirts to be restyled…